Coffee review

Kenya has invested 6 billion dollars to support coffee cultivation, hoping to increase production and work with the Rainforest Alliance to certify compliance with EU regulations.

Published: 2024-05-25 Author:
Last Updated: 2024/05/25, Currently, Kenya produces 51000 metric tons of coffee a year, but the Kenyan government hopes to increase production through a number of strategic measures. It is hoped that an increase of 49000 metric tons in coffee production will meet global coffee demand and increase the country's international influence and economic strength. Recently, the Kenyan government

Currently, Kenya produces 51000 metric tons of coffee a year, but the Kenyan government hopes to increase production through a number of strategic measures. It is hoped that an increase of 49000 metric tons in coffee production will meet global coffee demand and increase the country's international influence and economic strength.

Recently, a spokesman for the Kenyan Government said that the Government recognized the key role of coffee in Kenya's economic growth and its strong support for the more than 5 million Kenyans involved in the entire coffee value chain, so the Government has taken strategic initiatives to increase production.

As a result, the Kenyan government recently decided to issue 6 billion shillings (US $37.62 million) to support coffee cultivation. The money will be used for coffee and cherry advanced revolving funds and production. The funding will begin in Makueni County and will then be distributed in 37 coffee producing counties, including Machakos, Cajado, Tata Vita, Kirinaga County and Muranga County.

And earlier, a non-governmental organization worked with cooperatives of the Gusii Coffee Farmers' Alliance (GCFCU) to boost coffee production and farmers' incomes. According to the Rainforest Alliance Kenya / Tanzania Regional Director, the NGO has launched the Gusii regenerated Agricultural Landscape (GURAL) Coffee Project to help certify coffee to meet global standards. The Rainforest Alliance is building partnerships to protect and restore forests, biodiversity, improve livelihoods and promote human rights, gender equality and social inclusion. And hope to support tea and coffee growers in adapting and mitigating climate change through nature-based solutions and locally led actions. It was also noted that high demand for coffee and tea in the global market led to 75 per cent of deforestation, fuelled the climate change crisis, and that more than 80 per cent of people in rural areas lived in extreme poverty. So the alliance aims to benefit 1 million farmers through the project by 2030.

Earlier, the EU issued the EU deforestation regulations (EUDR), which do not allow uncertified coffee to be sold in the EU, especially for African countries such as Kenya and Tanzania, where it is more difficult to meet the requirements. So Rainforest Alliance's help is timely, and there will be a partnership in Kenya's Nyamira and Kisii counties to improve local sustainable coffee production, as well as 28 union-affiliated coffee cooperatives, six of which are being piloted. Coffee will be raised to a new level, managing the environment and testing soil fertilizer to determine the right nutrients for growing plants, thereby increasing returns and benefiting farmers. Promote the production of quality and certified coffee, allow it to be sold in the European market, and raise prices to help farmers benefit.

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